The themes of redemption and forgiveness are at the core of this novel. Do you think redemption is found? Why or why not?
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charlie
charlie
11 months ago

yes because it just feels right

Erin
Erin
11 months ago

I think redemption is found for most of the characters. Amadeus finally gets a job and is able to provide a little instead of always taking, he finally takes responsibility for himself instead of the constant excuses when he crashes the car with Connor inside. He becomes the father and grandfather he yearns be. Angel finds redemption in the circle of family and friends she gathers at the end of the book. Angel has felt alone with her responsibility of being a teenage parent without the help of her own and pushes people away while yearning for closeness and intimacy.… Read more »

Abby
Abby
11 months ago
Reply to  Erin

I completely agree with your assessment of all the characters.

Jen
Jen
11 months ago
Reply to  Abby

The book does suggest the possibility of hope for Lizette, though, and perhaps, by extension, Brianna.

Joe
Joe
11 months ago

I would categorize it more as realization than redemption. Amadeo and Angel both realize that they have to stop with the terrible decisions if they want to be there for baby Connor.

Shirley
Shirley
11 months ago
Reply to  Joe

I agree with you. The ending was so rushed that the reader does not know if they stay on track or go off road again.

Tiffany D
Tiffany D
11 months ago

Redemption is most obvious for Amadeus. After his accident with Connor, he realizes that he only has himself to blame for his bad choices. He realizes that he needs to grow up and help his daughter. He gets a job, and a finds a group of men who can act as a support system for him while he attempts to become a responsible adult. I don’t know if I ever felt like Angel needed redeeming. Her mistakes often felt juvenile. Was she sassy and defiant, yes. But so are most teenagers. She was still growing and developing as a person,… Read more »

Abigail Ferguson
Abigail Ferguson
11 months ago

Maybe? So much depends on Amadeo’s sobriety. And the book takes place in only a year of time and true change I think may take longer than that to believe it’s sticking.

Tiffany D
Tiffany D
11 months ago

I agree that Amadeo’s sobriety is key. Being an alcoholic is something that is a lifelong struggle.

AB_uname
AB_uname
11 months ago

I think it depends on your definition of forgiveness. The author makes it clear that some acts are irreversible, and in that sense, perhaps beyond redemption. What stood out to me (spoiler alert) after the accident would be the ghost life that would always linger as a specter of shame from that night. Other characters had sympathy of how their lives might have turned out differently, but that is distinct from redemption, as their lives still took paths of terrible destruction (such as Anthony and his addiction). If you define forgiveness as the conscious choice to forgive each other though,… Read more »

Mary F Wolfe
Mary F Wolfe
11 months ago

I think that Amadeo’s redemption began at the moment he realized that carrying the cross did not symbolize manliness but symbolized the love that Jesus had for mankind. Once he came to grips with what it means to be manly, he was on the way to redemption. Before that time every time he experienced emotions he believed he was weak….not manly…..and needed to drink to erase the feelings he hated having. angel began to be redeemed when she realized that the people around her had their own problems that prevented them from being constantly there for her. She realized that… Read more »

Kathy
Kathy
11 months ago

Yes, each person found redemption in their small season of life. They were able to grow and overcome the large obstacles blocking their heart to forgive.

Margaret
Margaret
11 months ago

The temptation would be to see the characters as proceeding forward or downward. Instead the author allows room for them to grow and the book ends with hope as its signature.

Margaret
Margaret
11 months ago

Amadao’s “penitente” or hermano experience is realistic as the brothers are either elderly or have all died. The young men are not drawn into a community which in the past gave them hope.

Pat
Pat
11 months ago

I didn’t like the ending where I was asked to believe that Jesus dying on the cross fixed all the “sins”. Angel worked hard to change her situation, slow and steady, no miracles. I don’t recall her leaning on a god. We lived through her excruciating growth. But then suddenly, happy ending- no more drinking, reconciliation with Angel’s mom, baby-daddy grandma kicking in support and happily ever after.

Sandy B
Sandy B
11 months ago

Yes, Amadeo finally redeemed himself after the truck accident, he and baby are alive. He doesn’t drink another drop.