Scrublands – Question 1

Despite being set in a fictional town, Scrublands has a strong sense of place. What elements does Chris Hammer include to achieve this?
0 0 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
12 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Rob Diamond
Rob Diamond
23 days ago

My husband and I are listening to Scrublands together, we’re both thinking the priest’s shooting of the men out front of the church is targeted to keep the truth about the priest’s former life hidden. And wondering where or who the eight bullet hit?
Enjoying the twists and turns atm

Sean
Sean
20 days ago

The overwhelming sense of heat

Cynthia
Cynthia
20 days ago

By including real places as a reference point, the town appears real.

MMM
MMM
18 days ago

I liked that it was set in Australia, and NSW for that matter, because I felt that I could relate, and know the places (roughly) and also the slang.

Krissy
Krissy
17 days ago

The historical buildings, families who have resided there for generations, tough climate, and routines and characteristics of the residents

Cindy
Cindy
17 days ago

Part of establishiing the sense of “place” was the description of the taking of photos of storefronts, the soldier statue from different angles, the detail about how cars were parked in the town; the vivid descriptions of the heat/drought. I thought the author managed to describe buildings, scrubland, farm buildings etc. in such a way as they could be “seen” in my mind as I read. Probably helps to have seen movies/docos set in Aussie backcountry?

Monika
Monika
12 days ago
Reply to  Cindy

Good point, Cindy, I hadn’t realised just how important the taking of photos was in evoking the sense of place until you mentioned it!
I also found the sketch map at the start very useful in visualising the town.

Barb
Barb
12 days ago

Description of heat, sand, dust, crumbling buildings so graphic, painted a picture of the town. This became the backdrop to the story

Deborah Johnston
Deborah Johnston
10 days ago

Giving road signs, and being on Hay Rd, Hay one way, Deniliquin the other, Swan Hill and Corowa also being mentioned all gives it a real sense of place. Most eastern seaboard readers would be familiar with some or all of these towns.

Shelley
Shelley
9 days ago

You are correct. I am from Queensland but the moment actual towns and rivers are mentioned, my brain placed Riversend on the map. I have only travelled through that area five or six times in my life but the authors descriptions worked.

Craig
Craig
9 days ago

The heat, the flies, the haze, the buildings, the animals and plants, could be anywhere in outback Australia. The sense of defeat and loneliness is also generic of isolated towns. Without the use of actual places as anchors this story could be set in any state of Australia.

Sam
Sam
4 days ago

Chris describes Riversend in detail, the buildings, the lone soldier memorial as well as the lack of activity in the town. The shops that are only open bi-weekly and the heat that is also a factor of the town.